CBP supervisor arrested after July 4 fireworks explosion

FD4

By Oliver Lazenby

A Customs and Border Protection supervisor who works in Blaine is scheduled to face trial in October after getting drunk, blowing up a garage, and injuring three people in a fireworks accident at a Fourth of July party.

Whatcom County sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to a party at 3736 Spring Coulee Road north of Bellingham on July 4 at 9:47 p.m. after receiving reports of a fire and injuries. Witnesses at the party reported that Detlef Goellner, 52, was drunk and acting out of control. He was throwing firework “poppers” at people in the yard and then entered the garage where a “neatly stacked collection of fireworks” was set on a table.

After throwing more poppers at the ground, Goellner grabbed a mortar-style firework from the stack, according to witnesses interviewed by deputies.

Partygoers told Goellner to “stop” and “calm down,” and someone shouted “Don’t light that!”

Goellner lit it and hurled it outside, according to the sheriff’s office. Sparks from the mortar ignited the entire stack which then exploded before bystanders could get away; about 15 people were within 10 feet of the explosion when it happened, witnesses said.

Lindsay Alexander, 20, was knocked off her feet by the explosion. Medics treated her for leg injuries, possibly from shrapnel, at the scene and she later went to the hospital for further treatment.

Two men suffered from smoke inhalation while attempting to put out the fire. One went to the hospital and the other didn’t immediately seek treatment.

The explosion caused significant damage, including structural damage, to the garage. Homeowner Brad Alexander estimated the damage to be around $20,000, but told deputies it could be as much as $60,000. He also said the fireworks were stored well away from the designated firework lighting area and that safety measures such as an emergency water bucket were in place.

Sheriff’s deputies arrested Goellner on suspicion of reckless burning in the first degree, which is a class C felony and carries a maximum sentence of five years and a $10,000 fine. He was also charged with three misdemeanor counts of reckless endangerment. In Whatcom County Superior Court on July 4, $10,000 bail was set by commissioner Martha Gross who said Goellner had “endanger[ed] a lot of people” and was “someone who should’ve known better.”

A September 21 pre-trial hearing will determine if the case will go to trial as scheduled on October 3. A no harassment/no contact order prohibits Goellner from contacting Lindsay Alexander, Brad Alexander and another witness, Harold Hurlbert. Goellner is also prohibited from leaving Whatcom County without court permission. On July 15, an order modifying the conditions of release allowed Goellner to travel to Arizona for 17 days to visit his children.

Goellner had previously served at the Point Roberts port of entry. On June 7, 2015, Goellner was on duty when B.C. resident Jim Graham collapsed at the border after suffering a heart attack. As reported by the All Point Bulletin, “first on the scene was Customs and Border Protection officer Detlef Goellner who was out of the building in ‘moments,’ and began performing CPR, bringing Graham ‘back from the brink of death twice.’ Goellner had recently finished a course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

“Goellner kept Graham alive until the arrival of a crew from the Point Roberts fire department with paramedic Ben Boyko who carried on until the arrival of an Airlift Northwest helicopter. Graham was then transported to PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center in Bellingham.”

Graham later made a full recovery and was present at a ceremony a few months later when Goellner and others were presented with an award by congresswoman Suzan DelBene.

  1. Charges will be dropped, he won’t be reprimanded, and he won’t lose his Nexus.

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  2. I used to work with this guy in Arizona. He seemed to be a good guy who had his head screwed on straight. This incident is beyond belief!

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    • My sister-in-law kept getting flagged as she entered the U.S. Every time. It always took a trip to secondary for her to clear, and she always did. The last time was with Officer Goellner. He took the time to research what was going on and he discovered what the problem was. If it were not for Officer Goellner going above and beyond, I bet we’d still be dealing with this issue. We cross frequently and the CBP crew does good work, but Ofc Goellner is really good.

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  3. He is my ex husband & I’ve known him for 30 yrs. We met in Greece as he’s from there (Greek mother & German father). He was a victim of a terrorist explosion at an American pub in Glyfada, Greece in 1985 – the ‘Bobby’s Bar’ incident. He was hurt badly along with many others there. We got married in Greece, then moved to the U.S. & he joined the Army. His life changed suddenly – he divorced me, then was discharged from the Army afterwards. This incident would have surprised me many years ago when we were together, but it doesn’t now, since I saw the drastic change in his personality.

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  4. The message here should be that drunks and fireworks shouldn’t mix. I worked in the US Customs Service for 30 years and the vast amount of personnel were conscientious employees. I only saw two instances where men came to work drunk or were secretly drinking on the job. That this man is a Supervisor makes the off- duty public drunkenness and seeming stupidity more serious.

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