Close Encounters of the Cetacean Kind

Close Encounters of the Cetacean Kind: Kayakers, canoeists and stand up paddlers are enjoying closeup encounters with three gray whales that have been feeding in Boundary Bay for the last few weeks. The whales, once known by whalers as devilfish due to their ferocity when defending themselves or their young, migrate annually between the Arctic and Baja California. The population of the Eastern Pacific gray whale is estimated to be about 27,000, down from a pre-whaling peak of 76,000-120,000. In 2019, there were a record 122 and 214 strandings of the whales in the U.S. and Canada, respectively.
Tom Fijal
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Close Encounters of the Cetacean Kind: Kayakers, canoeists and stand up paddlers are enjoying closeup encounters with three gray whales that have been feeding in Boundary Bay for the last few weeks. The whales, once known by whalers as devilfish due to their ferocity when defending themselves or their young, migrate annually between the Arctic and Baja California. The population of the Eastern Pacific gray whale is estimated to be about 27,000, down from a pre-whaling peak of 76,000-120,000. In 2019, there were a record 122 and 214 strandings of the whales in the U.S. and Canada, respectively.

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